Buteyko Breathing method

Buteyko Breathing Method

The Buteyko Breathing Method, developed in the 1950’s by Russian medical scientist Dr.Konstantin Buteyko, teaches you how to bring your breathing volume back toward normal or, in other words, reverse what’s called chronic hyperventilation or chronic over-breathing. When your breathing is normal, you have better oxygenation of tissues and organs, including your brain

HOW TO DO IT
The Buteyko Breathing Technique teaches you how to breathe properly through the nose (not the mouth) and with the diaphragm to improve nitric oxide and carbon dioxide levels in the body. When done properly, Buteyko breathing encourages the activation of the parasympathetic nervous system, resulting in a reduction of blood pressure, a reduction of stress and the strengthening of the immune system. Here are the simple steps to perform this technique.

Preparation

  1. Sit on the floor or on a chair.
  2. Elongate your spine to maintain an upright posture.
  3. Relax your respiration muscles.
  4. Breathe normally for a few minutes.

The Control Pause

  1. After a relaxed exhale, hold your breath.
  2. Use your index finger and thumb to plug your nose.
  3. Retain your breath until you feel the urge to breathe, which may include an involuntary movement of your diaphragm, and then inhale.
  4. Breathe normally for at least 10 seconds.
  5. Repeat several times.

The Maximum Pause

  1. After a relaxed exhale, hold your breath.
  2. Use your index finger and thumb to plug your nose.
  3. Retain your breath for as long as possible, which is usually twice the length of time of the Control Pause.
  4. Once you’ve reached the point of moderate discomfort, inhale.
  5. Breathe normally for at least 10 seconds.
  6. Repeat several times.

WHY IT WORKS
Studies have shown that breathing lightly and only through the nose is the ideal technique for relaxation and optimal health. One such study on the effect of Buteyko breathing technique on patients with bronchial asthma showed a significant decrease in asthma related symptoms and a significant improvement in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR)1

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